Senior Production: Initialization

Hey everyone,

My final semester at Champlain College has begun, and I am once again required to write about my experiences in the last half of my capstone class.

This last week was about reworking the networking for the game. Our new programmer, Dan, and I were working together to remedy some of the hacky solutions I came up with while rapidly developing VacuuLab. We decided it would be best to create an authoritative server set up to ease the implementation of game features and be able to monitor the game closely. Having a dedicated server would allow us to control the games and be able to make better decisions for level design and etc.

As far as the development, we have implemented smoothing and simple game play.

That is all for now.


Senior Capstone: The Wrap-up

These past few weeks have been wild… In terms of development the game is ever evolving and ever flowing. Like water… or goo?

To update you on things that have happened previously… the goo vacuum game has been named! VacuuLab! We finally settled on a name. It works, and rolls off the tongue… Or slides, or slimes, or glops off.. Regardless. With all this networking under my belt I feel as though I am a Networking Ninja Master Code Guru.

All this work, and my neglect to work on a networked game has come together into a harmonious experience that has blossomed into a beautiful flower. In a technical sense there is a lot going on and it’s pleasing to see my work pay off.

We are now on the downward slope for the semester working into the tweaking and the polishing that the game needs. My effort in working towards an easy and smoothly flowing environment starts with refactoring the code. As with all game development, the code that creates the prototype is never pretty. When we started my code was very bad. I’m not saying that now it’s good, it’s probably mediocre at best, but now with the refactor it is manageable. This is one truth about all programmatic development: There will be bad code in a large game. Not all features in the game will have the most defined and planned code. It’s just how rapid development works. While these rapidly developed features may not be the most readable as long as they are functional, you must carry on.

With VacuuLab, this is the case for some mechanics and features. I’m not bothered by it, I don’t necessarily have the time to refactor my code to such a manageable degree… When I am implementing features on features into a very large game I don’t have the time to dedicate to fixing my code and making it look pretty.

Ultimately we will be adding and adjusting features for the game over the next few weeks.